Weekly Motion Cannon Podcast Episode 10 – Anime Strike

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This week CJ, The Subtitle Doctor and Josh Dunham have a discussion about Amazon‘s Anime Streaming Service, “Anime Strike.” The episode ends with a listener question on if Attack on Titan has a “Pro-military and Imperialist” message or not. If you’d like to submit a question to the show, please visit our Patreon page to learn how.

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Opening Theme: First Light by Makotot Matushita

Ending Theme: Armour Zone by Taro Kobayashi


-Anime Strike-

This week CJ, The Subtitle Doctor and Josh Dunham have a discussion about Amazon‘s Anime Streaming Service, “Anime Strike.” The episode ends with a listener question on if Attack on Titan has a “Pro-military and Imperialist” message or not.


-Excerpt-

Josh – You know why my body is 80% Anime right? It’s because I killed Tezuka.

CJ – Wow, that is impressive considering you weren’t even born when he died.

Josh – I am the Zodiac Killer.

 


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5 Comments

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  1. invalidnameicloud July 23, 2017 — 8:59 am

    I’m sorry, but I’ve got to object to the way you guys characterized “catalog” titles, in discussing Crunchyroll and Anime Strike’s respective back-catalogs. “Catalog” doesn’t mean “stuff almost nobody watches” and shouldn’t immediately be equated with Captain Harlock and green-jacket Lupin. “Catalog” is also “Madoka Magica”, which is now six years old. You know what else is catalog? “Kill La Kill”. The original “Love Live”. “Bakemonogatari”. Personally, I think you could make the argument that “catalog” is anything more than a year old, which means “Yuri On Ice” becomes catalog at the end of the year.

    And it’s important because while simulcasting is the focus, there are also new fans coming in to anime who want to catch up on the new canon, the stuff that everyone already knows, talks about, and memes. The shows that are “The New Classics”, as cable’s TBS used to call movies of a similar vintage. Access to the last 5 or so years worth of titles — catalog titles — is how those fans figure out what we mean by “potato girl” or “don’t lose your way”.

    [sorry if this is a duplicate… frickin’ WordPress]

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am totally with you, Chris. For me, catalog is a huge huge part of the value proposition of these services. If not for catalog titles, I’m not sure the services would be worth it for me; they’d certainly take a massive hit in value! I think our thinking behind putting emphasis on simulcasting as a selling point is what we hear fan behavior consists of and what we see fan conversation consist of. Those aren’t necessarily the best metrics, but (in my bubble at any rate) it often feels like the entire community is focused on the new hotness.

      Like

  2. Just starting to listen to this one today (8/8). I noticed that it was mentioned that the video portion of Prime is ‘only’ $8/month… which seems to add up to $96/year. For $4 more you get all of Prime. Is it the lump sum that seems to be the issue?

    Like

    • Many arguments hinge on the inability of anime fans to afford all the streaming services they want. Thus, I thought the lump sum payment upfront was a sticking point for many. In fact, I’ve seen that this is so “in the wild.”

      Like

  3. All these casts, videos, articles, about Anime Strike and Netflix (don’t ruin our streaming) are “me enchendo o saco”. Each corporation is putting money on their service, just pay or just don’t watch, what more to say and do?
    Unfortunately it’s the harsh reality, today we received the news that Disney will create it’s own streaming service, making more clear than ever that the dream of having an one place to watch it all in the internet at our convenience was just a dream. “Channels” will continue to exist like before on our TVs, just in a smaller number.

    Like

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